Political Science

 

Political Science Program Requirements

This major is designed to offer the interested student an opportunity to examine many related aspects of political life including the emerging links between politics in nation states and the on-going phenomenon of globalization. The courses will acquaint the student with various methods of analysis available for and applicable to the study of political institutions, political thought, and political behavior.

The Political Science major emphasizes global citizenship. The department's curriculum prepares students for the challenges of the 21st century by teaching skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, oral and written communication, and ethical appreciation as well as the substance of politics. The curriculum offers students many opportunities for experiential learning, civic engagement, and collaborative research with faculty and other students. Given its historical affiliation with issues of citizenship, justice, and relations among different nations, Political Science enjoys a special kinship with the Baldwin Wallace University mission statement of preparing students to become "contributing, compassionate citizens of an increasingly global society."

Political Science Major

Computer Code: POLS


Minimum required hours: 36, 15 of which must be taken at Baldwin Wallace University

Required courses

POL

101D

U.S. Government and Politics

4 credits

POL

211I

International Politics

4 credits

POL

221I

Comparative Politics

4 credits

POL

231

Political Theory

4 credits

POL

240

Political Analysis OR

4 credits

POL

241

Public Interest Research

POL/INT

490

Junior/Senior Colloquium

1 credit


Elective courses:
At least five additional courses, totaling 15 semester hours, are required. Four of these additional courses (12 or more semester hours), one in each of the four major subfields noted below, must be taken at the 300-400 course level. Take entry courses before enrolling in more advanced courses. Take the Analysis class only after taking at least two of the other required courses.

No prerequisites for most courses in political science, but some presuppose a prior exposure to specific subject matters. Recommended backgrounds for courses are listed in the course descriptions.


American Politics- any one of the following:

POL

301

Congress, the Presidency, and Elections

3 credits

POL

302

Political Parties, Interest Groups, and Policy

3 credits

POL

303

Public Administration

3 credits

POL

304D

Urban Politics

3 credits

POL

305D

Women, Politics, and the Media

3 credits

POL

306

Judicial Process

3 credits

POL

307

American Constitutional Law

3 credits

POL

308D

Civil Rights and Liberties

3 credits

POL

309

Criminal Law and the Constitution

3 credits

International Politics- any one of the following:

POL

311I

American Foreign Policy

3 credits

POL

314I

Comparative Foreign Relations

3 credits

POL

315I

International Organization

3 credits

POL

363I

Special Topics

2-3 credits

POL

463I

Special Topics

2-3 credits

Comparative Politics- any one of the following:

POL

321I

Democracy & Democratization

3 credits

POL

322I

Russia and Eastern Europe

3 credits

POL

326I

Special Comparative Political Studies

2-3 credits

POL

327I

Political Change in Asia

3 credits

POL

329I

Government and Politics in Sub-Saharan Africa

3 credits

Political Theory- any one of the following:

POL

330

History of Political Philosophy I: Ancient and Medieval

3 credits

POL

331

History of Political Philosophy II: Early Modern and Modern

3 credits

POL

332

American Political Thought

3 credits

POL

333D

Contemporary Political Voices at the Margins

3 credits

POL

339

Special Topics in Political Theory

3 credits

any one (1) additional elective. 

Political Science Minor
Of the 20 hours offered for the minor, at least nine must be taken at Baldwin Wallace.
Any student may minor in Political Science. With its emphasis on broad skill development, substantive politics, and civic awareness, the minor complements many different majors. Every Baldwin Wallace student must learn to cope successfully with a complex 21st century world. The Political Science minor is designed to help students develop this capacity.

Required courses:

 

Two courses from: POL 101D, 211I, 221I, 231, 240/241

8 credits

Two advanced courses at 300-400 level

6 credits

Any two additional courses

6 credits


Students majoring in Business Administration should profitably minor in Political Science. Suggestions for Business students with a minor concentration in public affairs would be 20 hours from: 

Two courses from POL 101D, 211I, 221I, 231
Two advanced courses from 301-309, 311I, 314I, and/or 321I-327I
Any two additional POL courses

 

Legal Studies Minor

Foundation Course: (3 credits)

POL

207

Introduction to Law

3 credits


*Basic Courses:
Take 2 of the following (6-8 credits)

POL

101D

U.S. Government and Politics

4 credits

POL

231

Introduction to Political Theory

4 credits

PHL

102

Ethics

3 credits

PHL

104

Critical Thinking

3 credits

PHL

205

Topics in Ethics

3-4 credits

PHL

209

Political and Social Philosophy

4 credits


**Advanced Law Courses: Take 3 of the following (9 credits)

POL

306

Judicial Process

3 credits

POL

307

American Constitutional Law

3 credits

POL

308D

Civil Rights and Liberties

3 credits

POL

309

Criminal Law and the Constitution

3 credits

BUS

326

Legal Environment of Organizations

3 credits

BUS

328

Business Law

3 credits


*
Political Science majors fulfill requirement with at least one PHL course
** Political Science majors fulfill requirement with at least one BUS course



Careers in Political Science

Political Science majors pursue varied careers after graduation in government, nonprofit, legal, educational, business, and community organizations. The department emphasizes both broad skill-development and substantive knowledge to prepare students for flexible and successful careers. For more specific information about career opportunities, interested students should read the materials available in the Departmental offices, and consult with individual faculty members.

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