Psychology

 

Psychology Course Descriptions

 

PSY

050(I)

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Credit hours to be arranged

See Independent Study Program, Section II.

PSY

070

INTERNSHIP

Credit hours to be arranged

See Internship Program, Section II.

PSY

259,359,459

FACULTY-STUDENT COLLABORATION

Credit hours to be arranged

See FSC Program, Section II.

PSY

100

PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE

Three credit hours

This course may be taken to partially satisfy the core curriculum requirement in the social sciences.

An introduction to the scientific study of behavior. Topics surveyed will include the study of brain-behavior relationships, sensation and perception, learning, memory and thinking, social and personality psychology, lifespan development, psychological disorders and psychotherapy. Additionally, this course will enhance critical thinking skills by acquainting students with fundamental research techniques and with the interpretation and evaluation of research findings.

PSY

150

PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY FOR THE PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR

Two credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100. Must be Psychology major or minor to enroll.

This course provides students with an overview of contemporary career opportunities in psychology. Information is presented regarding what psychology majors can do with their degree.  In addition, the course will cover the preparation required to work in various settings or pursue graduate study in psychology or related fields.  Service-learning activities supplement the professional development of students enrolled in this course.

PSY

151

SKILLS IN PSYCHOLOGY

Two credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100. Must be Psychology major or minor to enroll.

This course is designed to provide students with the foundational skills and knowledge necessary for successful completion of the psychology major. The content of this course will build upon the knowledge acquired in Principles of Psychology. The fundamental skills covered in this course include scientific literacy, critical thinking, and familiarity with written and oral presentation techniques used in the field of psychology.

PSY

205

DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Three credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100. This course may be taken to partially satisfy the core curriculum requirement in the social sciences.

A course designed to help the student gain knowledge of the sequence of human development from conception and birth through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and aging. The impact of biological and interpersonal factors in the growth and maturation of the individual is considered.

PSY

215D

PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100.

This major purpose of this course is the examination of the gendered experience of being female in a world that socially constructs gender.  Topics include sex roles, violence against women, body image, work, parenting and development. Special attention is paid to the intersections of gender and other identities such as race, class, sexual orientation, and size, and how these experiences relate to the physical and mental health of women.  Students of all genders and class levels are welcome.

PSY

220

CHILD MALTREATMENT

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100

Every 10 seconds in the U.S., a child is abused or neglected.  Why does this happen? What are the short and long-term consequences?  How do we help survivors of abuse?  This course explores the answers to these questions and more.  The course includes a service learning component.

PSY/BIO

250

PRINCIPLES OF NEUROSCIENCE

Three credit hours

This course may be taken to partially satisfy the core curriculum requirement in either the Social Sciences (PSY 250) or the Natural Sciences (BIO 250).

An introduction to the study of the brain and behavior. The brain is the only organ that studies itself. In this course students will become familiar with recent advances in the growing field of Neuroscience as they consider how their brains work and how the nervous system grows, perceives, controls the body, sleeps, ages and responds to damage and disease

PSY

263

SPECIAL TOPICS SEMINARS

One to four credit hours

Prerequisites dependent on topic

Seminars reflecting the depth & breadth of Psychology are offered periodically.

PSY

273

INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL EXPERIENCE

Two credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100

This course is intended for freshman and sophomore level students who are interest in pursuing an applied experience in psychology. Students are assigned to a clinical or work setting for an experiential learning opportunity. Student work under the supervision of the personnel of the institution in which they are placed, as well as indirectly under the supervision of the faculty member teaching the course. Progress is assessed by the consultation between students, the institutional supervisor and the faculty supervisor.

PSY

278

ELEMENTS OF STATISTICS

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100 Sociology majors who have taken SOC 100D may also be admitted to this course. This course will not count toward satisfying the social sciences portion of the core curriculum requirement of the University.

This course is designed for behavioral science students and covers such topics as measures of central tendency, variability, tests of significance, confidence intervals, regression analysis and correlation. In addition, the students will receive an introduction to computer data analysis and advanced inferential techniques.

PSY

279

LABORATORY IN STATISTICAL METHODS

Two credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 278, or concurrent with PSY 278. Must be Psychology major or minor to enroll.

This course will introduce students to PASW, a statistical software package commonly used by psychologists.  Students will learn techniques important to data analysis including data entry and transformation, descriptive and inferential statistics, interpretation of results, graphical presentation of data and APA style reporting conventions.

PSY

280

RESEARCH METHODS

Three credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100 and 278.

This course provides an overview of research techniques and design considerations that are central to a variety of sub-disciplines within psychology (e.g., cognitive, physiological, sensation and perception, developmental, clinical, learning, social, industrial/organizational, etc.). Students are also familiarized with ethical issues involved in conducting psychological research. Students develop a proposal for a study of their own design.

PSY

281

THESIS IN PSYCHOLOGY

Three credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 280 and PSY 278

This course entails conducting the research project that was designed in PSY 280. The student research is facilitated by discussions in class and through individual instruction each week. The student will gain hands-on research experience, analytical skills, scientific writing abilities and oral presentation skills. A grade of ā€œCā€ or higher in PSY 280 is required to enroll in this course.

PSY

301

PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 278 or consent of the instructor

A study of the field of psychological testing and assessment. The course will focus on issues of reliability, validity, and psychometrics. Special attention will be given to the areas of intelligence, aptitude, educational, and personality testing. Ethical, legal, and judgmental issues in psychological assessment in clinical, industrial, and educational settings will be explored.

PSY

302

ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100

A survey of the phenomena of psychopathology, including historical background, symptomatology, incidence, course and etiology of a wide array of pathologies including, to name a few, stress-related disorders, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, personality disorders and the schizophrenias. A brief review of treatment will also be presented.

PSY/BIO

303

PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100 or BIO 203L or consent of instructor.

This lecture-laboratory course provides an overview of the physiological bases of behavior, cognition, motivation, emotion, learning and memory. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of brain and endocrine system functioning.

PSY

304

PERSONALITY PSYCHOLOGY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100. This course may be taken to partially satisfy the core curriculum requirement in the social sciences.

An introduction to the general subject of personality. Emphasis is on the determinants of a healthy personality in such areas as emotions, self-concept and interpersonal relations. The course consists of a review of major theories of personality and an introduction to research methods and testing.

PSY

312D

COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100. PSY 304 is recommended.

This seminar is designed to expose students to the various counseling theories, techniques, specialties, as well as assessment and ethical issues. Students will learn and implement beginning counseling techniques. Students acquire knowledge and engage in the counseling psychology supervision process.

PSY

315

CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100, and PSY 205 or EDU 203 or EDU 205

The span of life from birth until puberty is examined with a focus on the following areas of development: genetics, prenatal, physical, perceptual, cognitive, language, emotional, social, self-concept, gender, and moral development. Also addressed will be the influence of various contexts including the family, peers, school, and society.

PSY

316D

CHILD PSYCHOPATHOLOGY

Three credit hours

Prerequisites: PSY 205, PSY 315, or consent of the instructor

A study of the specific psychological disorders exhibited during childhood. Emphasis is placed on childhood disorders as normal development gone awry. Symptomatology, course, etiology and treatment will be examined for emotional and behavioral disturbances in children and adolescents.

PSY

320

INDUSTRIAL/ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100.

A study of psychological research and theory as applied to work settings. The course will emphasize industrial issues such as job analysis, job evaluation, validation, and performance appraisal and organizational issues such as corporate culture, downsizing, organizational justice, stress, leadership and motivation. Job design and ergonomics issues will also be reviewed. The course will also examine the legal and ethical context of the practice of industrial/organizational psychology.

PSY

321

HUMAN RELATIONS AND GROUP DYNAMICS

Three credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100. This course may be taken to partially satisfy the core curriculum requirement in the social sciences.

A course designed to examine interpersonal relationships in small and large groups. Current theory and research is presented, along with experiential exercises. A major focus is on leadership skills and group development.

PSY

325

ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100, and PSY 205 or EDU 206

The span of life between puberty and young adulthood is examined with special attention given to such factors as previous developmental experience, cultural variables, physiological changes, cognitive development, identity formation, interpersonal relations, delinquency, substance abuse, and adolescent psychopathologies.

PSY

326

APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS

Three credit hours

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or consent of instructor.

This course covers the various methodologies used by behavior analysts to change maladaptive behaviors. Students will design and carry out a project to change some behavior(s) of their own choosing.

PSY

327

PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING

Four credit hours

Prerequisites: PSY 100 or consent of instructor.

A study of the historical development of theories of learning, with a focus on experimental technique and results. The course emphasizes three areas: innate behaviors, classical conditioning, and operant conditioning. A lab component exposes the student to all three areas.

PSY

328

COGNITIVE PROCESSES

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 280

A study of the processes by which people receive, transform and store incoming information and retrieve stored information. Specific topics examined include perception, concept formation, levels of memory processing, the relation of cognitive and language processes, models of semantic organization and artificial intelligence.

PSY

329

SENSATION AND PERCEPTION

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 280

This course provides an introduction to the study of the principles of sensation and perception. Emphasis is placed on understanding how individuals obtain information from the environment and various theories as to how that information is processed. Topics will include basic sensory physiology, psychophysics, visual perception, auditory perception, tactile perception, and the chemical senses. In addition the students will gain first hand experiences in carrying out several classical perceptual experiments and will gain research skills relevant to the field of sensation and perception.

PSY

335

ADULT DEVELOPMENT AND AGING

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100; offered in alternate years.

A study of biological, cognitive, sociocultural and interpersonal changes that occur between young adulthood and old age. This course is designed for students from many disciplines concerned with applied problems associated with the aging process. Intellectual functioning, health issues, vocational development, parenting and family issues, personality development, clinical problems and ecological factors are some of the specific topics covered.

PSY

339

SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

Four credit hours

Prerequisites: PSY 100, or consent of the instructor; PSY 280 recommended. This course may be taken to partially satisfy the core curriculum requirement in the social sciences.

A study of psychological principles underlying social behavior. Problems in perception, motivation, social cognition, social interaction attitudes, values and prejudice in person/group relationships are studied.

PSY

345D

Multicultural psychology

Three to four credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100

Multicultural psychology is the study of race and ethnic diversity and its impact on the field of psychology. This course will address the issue of multiculturalism as it relates to the history of psychology, research, testing and counseling specific to racial and ethnic groups in America. Students will gain an understanding of the role of culture on society as well as the therapeutic process.

PSY

363

SEMINAR

One to four credit hours

Prerequisite dependent on topic.

Advanced seminars reflecting the depth and breadth of Psychology are offered periodically.

PSY

373

SEMINAR IN CLINICAL EXPERIENCE

Two credit hours

Prerequisite: Three Psychology courses including PSY 302

Students meet weekly to study, discuss, and experience techniques of counseling and clinical psychology. Students explore the ways behavior is changed through clinical intervention. Frequent field trips expose students to a variety of clinical settings and help form realistic expectations for careers in psychology. This course is graded S/U (pass/fail).

PSY

412

HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 281

This course covers the development of psychological thought through the ages, beginning in the pre-Socratic period. There is a heavy emphasis on critical analysis of the issues (for example, dualism, empiricism, etc.) that have faced Psychology through time. This course fosters individualized student thought. In addition to a text book, original readings from the classics are emphasized and explored.

PSY

463

SEMINAR

One to four credit hours

Prerequisite dependent on topic.

Advanced seminars reflecting the depth and breadth of Psychology are offered periodically.

PSY

473

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE

Credit hours to be arranged

Prerequisites: PSY 373 and consent of the instructor

Students are assigned to a clinical setting for a learning and work experience. Students work under the supervision of the personnel in the institution to which they are assigned. Progress is assessed by consultation between the students, the institutional supervisor and the instructor. The course is graded S/U (pass/fail).

PSY

491,492

DEPARTMENTAL THESIS/PROJECT

Credit hours to be arranged

See Departmental Thesis/Project, Section II.

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