Political Science

 

Political Science Courses

POL

050(I)

INDEPENDENT STUDY

One to four credit hours

See Independent Study Program, Section II.

POL

070

INTERNSHIP

Credit hours to be arranged

See Internship Program, Section II.

POL

259,359,459

FACULTY-STUDENT COLLABORATION

Credit hours to be arranged

See FSC Program, Section II.

POL

101D

U.S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

Four credit hours

This course introduces students to U.S. national government and politics, with special attention to the impact of diversity on the ongoing struggle for democracy.

POL

102(I)

CONCENTRATION IN POLITICS

One to three credit hours

A concentrated study of a particular aspect of politics, a particular ideology or issue, or a particular individual or group which has significance politically. The specific topic to be studied will be announced each semester in the course schedule by the professor teaching the section. Students may repeat the course and register for as many sections of POL 102(I) as they wish, as long as they do not repeat the same topic.

POL

202

MAJOR POLICY ISSUES

One to three credit hours

Recommended background: POL 101D

An introduction to the study of major policy issues facing the American system today. The issues examined include such matters as energy and the environment, national defense, elections, agricultural subsidies, health care, civil rights, budget deficits, affirmative action, and other matters of national concern.

POL

205

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS

Three credit hours

An examination of the problems, options and issues generated by governmental efforts to address challenges to a safe environment. The course includes case studies drawn from both American and international experiences.

POL

207

INTRODUCTION TO LAW

Three credit hours

This course represents a basic introduction to the American legal system. Particular emphasis is placed on identifying the various types of law and the types of conflicts they are intended to resolve. Students are introduced to the analysis of court decisions as a means to understanding some of the processes of legal reasoning. The course examines the law and the legal system from the perspective of the social sciences.

POL

208(D)

SPECIAL LEGAL STUDIES

One to three credit hours

This course is periodically offered to provide an intensive examination of some area of the law which has particularly contemporary interest. Regular offerings include: women and law, consumer law, and the like, with credit hours appropriate to the volume of work.

POL

209

POLITICAL HISTORY OF OHIO

Two credit hours

This course will explore the political, social, and economic history of the state of Ohio, from its roots as the Northwest Territory through its rise to economic and political prominence in the late 19th century, to its current political status as a midwestern “rust belt” state. The course will include analysis of the structure and dynamics of state political institutions and current issues of concern to Ohio.

POL

211I

INTERNATIONAL POLITICS

Four credit hours

Required for all majors

A study of the major concepts in international politics and their application to the events of the postwar world, particularly the Cold War and its aftermath, the North-South split and increasing interdependence. Emphasis is on the forces which motivate states to act and the possibilities for increasing conflict or cooperation. Attention is also given to the United Nations and to various regional organizations like the European Union.

POL

215I

UNITED NATIONS

Two credit hours

A study of the growth, activities and processes of political influence in the United Nations and its relation to the larger international political setting within which they function. This course or POL 315I is required for participants in the BW Model UN Team.

POL

216I

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS: CASE STUDIES

One to three credit hours

Prerequisite: POL 215I or POL 315I

An illustration of the factors determining the behavior or potential behavior of individual nations at the United Nations. This course serves as specific preparation for Model United Nations team participants. May be repeated if countries differ.

POL

221I

INTRO TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS

Four credit hours

Required for all majors

A comparative examination of selected government systems illustrating the variety of political systems in the world today.

POL

231

INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL THEORY

Four credit hours

Required for all majors

This course introduces students to the issues, debates, and methods of political philosophers. It emphasizes the use of political theory to solve public problems.

POL

239

POLITICAL ECONOMY

Three credit hours

Political economy addresses the intersection of money, justice and politics. This course introduces some of the terrain of political economy while giving students some grounding in discipline-defining debates and issues such as inequality, government taxing and spending, the impact of economic growth on the environment, corporate power, (un)employment, and the political economy of food. Offered in alternate years.

POL

240

INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL ANALYSIS

Four credit hours

Required for all majors

A study of political science methods of research and analysis with an emphasis on how those techniques can be applied to contemporary political issues. The course investigates the ways political scientists understand the political environment.

POL

241

PUBLIC INTEREST RESEARCH

Four credit hours

Students in this course learn social science research methods by applying them on behalf of community organizations. Students conduct research that helps policy makers, community activists, leaders and citizens find solutions to current social and political problems and improve the lives of area residents. This course may substitute for POL 240.

POL

263(I, D)

SEMINAR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE

One to three credit hours

An examination of selected topics in the field of political science. May be repeated for credit, depending on the topic of the specific seminar.

POL

301

CONGRESS, THE PRESIDENCY, AND ELECTIONS

Three credit hours

Recommended background: POL 101D

An intensive examination of the two elected branches of the American national government, Congress and the Presidency, with particular emphasis on the power relationships within and between them. Offered in alternate years.

POL

302

POLITICAL PARTIES, INTEREST GROUPS, AND POLICY

Three credit hours

Recommended background: POL 101D

An examination of the political process focusing on how Americans engage in elections and lobbying government. Most emphasis is placed on interest groups (or pressure groups) and political parties in the United States, their internal dynamics, and their impact on the American political system. Offered in alternate years.

POL

303

PUBLIC POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION

Three credit hours

Recommended background: POL 101D

An exploration of the processes by which public policy develops and how public agencies function.  Students learn about organizational behavior and fiscal and personnel management through study of a broad range of policy areas, including law enforcement, national security, healthcare, education, and sustainability.  Offered in alternate years.

POL

304D

URBAN POLICY AND POLITICS

Three credit hours

Recommended background: POL 101D

An examination of the policy problems facing American cities and suburbs, and the politics involved in addressing these issues. Attention is given to metropolitan problems as well as the relationships among governments at the local level and those at the state and national levels in the United States.

POL

305D

WOMEN, POLITICS, AND THE MEDIA

Three credit hours

Recommended background: POL 101D

Students will explore the history of women in politics and the impact of gender on campaigns and elections, laws, and public policy. Particular attention will be given to the role of women in the media, both as journalists and as the subject of media coverage.

POL

306

JUDICIAL PROCESS

Three credit hours

Recommended background: POL 101D

An in-depth exploration of the processes used by the state and federal judicial branches of American government. The course explores how the courts address criminal law, civil law, as well as looking at various facets of the legal process, including juries, judicial selection, judicial behavior, judicial policy development, and subsidiary judicial processes such as arbitration and alternative dispute resolution. This course is recommended for students preparing for law school or work in the criminal justice system. Offered in alternate years.

POL

307

AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

Three credit hours

Recommended background: POL 101D or American history

An extensive survey of the development of the American Constitution from l789 to the present. The course is built around discussions of landmark Supreme Court decisions. The separation of powers, the Presidency, the federal system, the commerce power and judicial review are among the topics covered. The course is especially recommended for students preparing for law school or work in the criminal justice system. Offered in alternate years.

POL

308D

CIVIL RIGHTS AND LIBERTIES

Three credit hours

Recommended background: POL 101D or American history

A study of the development in American Constitutional Law of the concept of civil liberty, including free speech and religion, free assembly, free press and equal protection of the laws. The course is especially recommended for students preparing for law school or work in the criminal justice system. Offered in alternate years.

POL

309

CRIMINAL LAW AND THE CONSTITUTION

Three credit hours

Recommended background: POL 101D or American history

An overview of modern criminal law, both substantive and procedural. Includes such topics as crimes against the person and property. Also includes constitutional law decisions on criminal law in the US: exclusionary rules, right to counsel, fair trial procedures and capital punishment are among the topics discussed. Recommended for Criminal Justice majors and Pre-law students.

POL

311I

AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY

Three credit hours

Recommended background: POL 101D or 211I

A study of the formulation and execution of foreign policy in the United States, together with an examination of the substantive issues of American foreign policy since World War II with an emphasis on the examination of current foreign policy issues in the post Cold War world. Offered in alternate years.

POL

314I

COMPARATIVE FOREIGN RELATIONS

Three credit hours

Recommended background: POL 211I

A study of foreign policies of various states with an emphasis on those of the major foreign powers. The course examines both the substance of policy and the process of policy formulation. Consult Course Schedule for specific countries. Offered alternate years.

POL

315I

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION

Three credit hours

The course will include the study of the United Nations as described in POL 215I and add in-depth study and research of additional international organizations. This course or POL 215I is required for participation in BW Model UN Team.

POL

321I

DEMOCRACY AND DEMOCRATIZATION

Three credit hours

Prerequisite: sophomore, junior or senior standing. Recommended background: POL 221I

The course focuses on the recent global spread of democratization. Through analysis of literatures of democratic theories, the course will explore the experiences of new democracies, their transition from authoritarian regimes, the variegated problems they face and possible solutions.

POL

322I

RUSSIA AND EASTERN EUROPE

Three credit hours

Prerequisite: sophomore, junior or senior standing. Recommended background: POL 221I

An examination of post-communist Russia and other selected systems of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Offered in alternate years.

POL

326I

SPECIAL COMPARATIVE POLITICAL STUDIES

Two or three credit hours

An examination of selected topics in comparative studies, including political systems such as democracy; political processes and political problems (like political development, revolution, etc.), and/or policy studies (like energy policy in industrial states, population policies, etc.). The course may be repeated when different subject areas are covered. Consult the Course Schedule for applicable information. Not offered every year.

POL

327I

POLITICAL CHANGE IN ASIA

Three credit hours

The course examines the past, present and future of East Asia in terms of the concept of political, economic, social and cultural change. Focusing on Japan, China (mainland), Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Korea (North and South), the course explores the following themes: the rise of nationalism and communism, the different paths to political modernization and economic development selected by the different countries, and the question of Korean reunification as well as issues in the China-Taiwan relationship. Offered in alternate years.

POL

329I

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

Three credit hours

Examination of political change in Africa south of the Sahara, with special reference to nationalism, nation-building, leadership and problems of development. Offered at least once every third year.

POL

330

HISTORY OF POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY I: ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL

Three credit hours

Recommended background: POL 231 and/or PHL 101(I)

Students examine the ideas of selected political philosophers from ancient Greece to the 16th century. A special effort is made to connect political ideas to concrete historical and cultural developments; to understand ideas as perspectives originating from, and representing, relative vantage points of power and interest; to understand how political philosophy is gendered; and to use political ideas to help understand contemporary issues. Offered in alternate years.

POL

331

HISTORY OF POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY II: EARLY MODERN AND MODERN

Three credit hours

Recommended background: POL 231 and/or PHL 101(I)

Students examine the ideas of selected political philosophers from the 16th century to the present. A special effort is made to connect political ideas to concrete historical and cultural developments; to understand ideas as perspectives originating from, and representing, relative vantage points of power and interest; to understand how political philosophy is gendered; and to use political ideas to help understand contemporary issues. Offered in alternate years.

POL

332

AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT

Three credit hours

Recommended background: POL 231 and/or PHL 101(I)

Students survey the history of U.S. political thought since the early 17th century as a way of helping understand U.S. political history into the present. Offered in alternate years.

POL

333D

CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL VOICES AT THE MARGINS

Three credit hours

Recommended background: POL 231 and/or PHL 101(I)

An examination of the political thought of selected contemporary thinkers who occupy the margins of American political and intellectual life. The course emphasizes diverse political thinkers whose ideas lie outside the dominant political culture. Offered in alternate years.

POL

339

SPECIAL TOPICS IN POLITICAL THEORY

Three credit hours

Recommended background: POL 231 and/or PHL 101(I)

An intensive examination of special topics in political philosophy. Subjects vary, and may address central political concepts such as justice, freedom, democracy, and the political thought of selected thinkers. Course can be repeated if subjects differ.

POL

363(I)

SEMINAR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE

Two or three credit hours

A junior-level seminar dealing with topics in a seminar format that are not covered elsewhere in the offerings. Not offered every year.

POL

463(I)

SEMINAR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE

Two or three credit hours

An intensive, senior-level examination of selected topics in the field of political science. Not offered every year.

POL

490

JR/SR INTEGRATIVE COLLOQUIUM

One credit hour

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Status and Political Science major or minor.

This one credit colloquium is designed to help students to analyze their academic and co-curricular experiences in ways that will help them develop post-graduation plans for graduate school or employment. Students will assemble a self-assessment portfolio and develop a deeper understanding about how to advance their interests in a variety of internship, career and/or graduate school opportunities. The colloquium is open to third and fourth year students majoring or minoring in Political Science and/or International Studies.

POL

491,492

DEPARTMENTAL THESIS/PROJECT

Credit to be arranged

See Departmental Thesis/Project, Section II.

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