Physics and Astronomy

 

Physics Courses

PHY

050I

INDEPENDENT STUDY

One to six credit hours

See Independent Study Program, Section II.

PHY

070

INTERNSHIP

Credit hours to be arranged

See Internship Program, Section II.

PHY

259,359,459

FACULTY-STUDENT COLLABORATION

Credit hours to be arranged

See FSC Program, Section II.

PHY

101L

ACOUSTICS

Four credit hours

A lecture-laboratory course providing an introduction to the field of sound with special attention to the areas of speech and music. This course is designed for students not majoring in science and presupposes nothing more than elementary high school mathematics and general science as a background. Science majors interested in the field of sound may find the course interesting on an audit or credit basis. Lab included.

PHY

102

TOPICS IN PHYSICS

Three credit hours 

Topics in Physics is a collection of introductory lecture courses in various areas and are primarily intended for students not majoring in science. All of the topics presuppose only a knowledge of high school mathematics and general science. All of the topics courses typically include the interdisciplinary links between the sciences, social sciences and humanities. PHY 102 may be repeated for credit if different topics are taken. No lab. The topics below are currently being offered on a regular basis.

Energy and the Future
A survey of current energy resources and possibilities for the future such as solar energy, geothermal energy, tidal energy and energy from nuclear fusion. Attention is paid to methods of energy production efficiency of energy usage, anticipated fuel reserves for various energy sources and the economic, environmental, political, social and aesthetic implications of energy production by various methods.

Science Through the Ages
A historical guide to science, scientists, which begins with the Greek roots of modern science and then traces in more detail the evolution of science during the past few centuries from an obscure esoteric activity to the professionalized, the industrialized, and democratic version of science we have today.

Physics of the 20th Century
A survey of the important physics that came about over the last century. The class will examine the theoretical successes, such as quantum theory and relativity, as well as some of the important technological developments such as solid state electronics and lasers.

Physics of Weather
An introduction survey course investigating the underlying physics of the Earth's climate. The course will investigate topics such as the short-term climate changes from the interaction of energy flow between the oceans, atmosphere, and land masses; solar radiation; weather fronts; cloud formation; condensation and precipitation; atmospheric electricity and lightning; and various storm phenomena.

PHY

103

FRONTIERS OF PHYSICS

Three credit hours

This course contains two distinct halves. The first half covers humanity's search for the ultimate building blocks of the universe, in short, the story of the atom. The second half covers the department of the nuclear bomb during World War II and the associated physics. In other words, the first half of the course teaches the fundamental physics needed to understand the bomb and the second half covers its actual development from a more historical perspective. PHY-103 is intended for students not majoring in science and presupposes only a knowledge of high school mathematics and general science. Because of the nature of the subject material covered, the course is also recommended for interested physics majors on either an audit or credit basis.

PHY

105L

PHYSICS IN EVERYDAY LIFE

Four credit hours

Offered primarily for Evening/Weekend Students; day students only with special permission.

A lecture-laboratory course in which physics principles underlying many phenomena encountered in daily life are studied. The course assumes no prior background in mathematics or physics other than the normal University entrance requirements. Topics are studied through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, and laboratories, which include "envelope experiments" that can be completed at home. Lab included.

PHY

106L

LIGHT, COLOR, VISION

Four credit hours

Offered primarily for Evening/Weekend Students; day students only with special permission.

A lecture-laboratory course investigating optical phenomena found in nature, photography, color vision and holography. The topics are studied in a way that is meaningful for those whose interests are in a variety of fields other than science: art, psychology, photography, etc. The course assumes no prior background in mathematics or physics other than the normal University entrance requirements. Emphasis is placed on the optical phenomena seen in everyday life. Light, color, and vision are studied through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, and laboratories, which include "envelope experiments" that can be completed at home. Lab included.

PHY

107L

SPACE FROM THE GROUND UP

Three credit hours

Offered primarily for Evening/Weekend Students; day students only with special permission.

A lecture-laboratory course intended to provide an insight into space propulsion, space power, space exploration, living in space, and future space ventures through the eyes of physicists, but in a way that would be meaningful for those whose interests are in a variety of other fields: art, psychology, photography, business, law, etc. The course assumes no prior background in mathematics or physics other than the normal University entrance requirements. Emphasis is placed on understanding the fundamental scientific principles and their application to space projects. Space related topics are studied through a combination of lectures, demonstrations and laboratories, which include "envelope experiments" which can be completed at home. Lab included.

PHY

131,132

GENERAL PHYSICS I, II

Four credit hours each

The student is assumed to have had high school mathematics through algebra and pre-calculus. High school physics and a familiarity with calculus are highly recommended or calculus can be taken concurrently.  Except by permission of the instructor, PHY 151L is to be taken concurrently with PHY 131 and PHY 152L to be taken concurrently with PHY 132. 

A two-semester sequence covering the standard physics topics expected for a major in physics, chemistry, pre-med, or pre-engineering.  Concepts are presented primarily in lecture-demonstration form, but in a sufficiently small class setting that allows for student questions.  The course emphasizes qualitative and quantitative problem solving skills. PHY 131 emphasizes mechanics and heat while PHY 132 delves into electricity, magnetism, light, and optics.  Students may not take both PHY 131 and 145 or both PHY 132 and 146 for credit.

PHY

151L,152L

INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS LAB I,II

One credit hours each

Except by permission of the instructor, PHY 151L is to be taken concurrently with PHY 131 and PHY 152L to be taken concurrently with PHY 132. 

Laboratory to accompany General Physics I and II (PHY 131, 132).  Experiments designed to investigate and reinforce the ideas and concepts developed in General Physics.  Employing recent computer technology to gather and graphically analyze data, PHY 151L emphasizes experiments in mechanics (motion, force, energy, etc.) and heat (temperature, heat capacity, latent heat, etc.).  PHY 152L first focuses on mechanical oscillations, static electricity, DC circuits, Ohm's law, frequency-dependent AC circuits, and magnetic effects.  Students gain some experience with "bread-boarding" circuits, and the use of modern digital multi-meters and CRT oscilloscopes. The last part of PHY 152L concentrates on the basic properties of light with experiments in reflection, refraction, simple optical systems, and interference.

PHY

145L,146L

APPLIED COLLEGE PHYSICS I,II

Five credit hours each

The student is assumed to have had high school mathematics through algebra and pre-calculus. High school physics and a familiarity with calculus are highly recommended or calculus can be taken concurrently.

A two-semester sequence covering most of the standard introductory physics topics needed for a science major or for those needing a lab science. Applied College Physics is presented primarily in a laboratory setting. Rather than lectures and demonstrations, almost all concept development is achieved by hands-on activities and many mini-investigations with an emphasis on student inquiry, peer interaction, and small group activities. Applied College Physics' slower rate of concept development results in the coverage of somewhat fewer topics, but in more depth and with more applications than does General Physics. The first semester emphasizes mechanics and heat while the second semester explores electricity, magnetism, light, and optics. Students may not take both PHY 131 and 145L or both PHY 132 and 146L for credit. Applied College Physics students are expected to schedule an additional hour in the lab each week so that the actual in-class time is the same as the General Physics and Introductory Physics Lab combination.

PHY

150L

PHYSICAL SCIENCE INVESTIGATIONS 2

Three credit hours

This physics course is designed for teachers in the upper elementary and middle school to improve the learning and teaching of basic physics concepts, and is intended as a complement to CHM-150L. Students will spend considerable time in the laboratory completing investigations that, in addition to exposing and clarifying basic physics concepts, can be used for effectively teaching students about physics. Ohio state science standards will be used as a guide for determining specific items of study. Topics covered include: sound, light and color, electricity, magnetism, properties of matter, the atom, force and motion, simple machines, force and fluids, and measurement.

PHY

200

SCIENCE

One to four credit hours

A study of a topic in science which may involve an interdisciplinary approach. Course content is determined by the department under whose auspices the course is offered. PHY 200 is not offered on a regular basis.

PHY

233

MODERN PHYSICS

Four credit hours

The student is assumed to have taken General Physics, Applied College Physics, or the equivalent and to have completed or be taking introductory calculus.

A one-semester introduction to the developments in physics since about 1900.  Topics such as special relativity, the Bohr atom, atomic and molecular physics, nuclear processes and the important experiments leading to the modern quantum theory are studied in detail.  In addition to important course material, Modern Physics begins the development of the applied math skills needed by the professional scientist.  PHY 233 is required for a physics minor, for all physics, pre-engineering majors, and some science teaching licensure. Modern Physics should be taken as soon as possible after completing General Physics or Applied College Physics. PHY 233 is normally offered every Fall semester.

PHY

260

ENGINEERING MATERIALS

Two credit hours

Prerequisite: one year of introductory physics and chemistry or instructor's permission

A lecture course studying the most important materials of practical interest to engineers and manufacturers. Special consideration will be given to the different physical and chemical characteristics of and the means of manufacturing metallic, polymeric, ceramic, and composite materials. PHY 260 is taught as needed as a minimester and is especially recommended for students in the pre-engineering program.

PHY

261

INTRODUCTION TO STATICS

Two credit hours

Prerequisite: one year of introductory physics or instructor's permission

A lecture course concentrating on equilibrium forces and torques on extended bodies. Topics covered include stress, strain, elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio, compression, tension, sheer, bending, torsion, power, moments of inertia, bending moments, beam deflection and Mohr's circle. PHY 261 is taught as needed as a minimester and is especially recommended for students in the pre-engineering program.

PHY

263

SEMINAR

One to four credit hours

Open to all students interested in physics. Not offered on a regular basis.

Reports and discussions of topics of interest in physics.

PHY

311

ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTATION

Three credit hours

Prerequisite: PHY 131, 132 or PHY 145L, 146L, or instructor´┐Żs permission

A lecture-laboratory course covering the basic principles of circuit design and analysis, use of standard modern instrumentation such as multi-meters, signal generators, and oscilloscopes.  The analog part of the course moves from basic DC resistor circuits, to AC frequency filters, diodes, bipolar transistors, op-amps, and 555 oscillator circuits. The digital portion covers analog to digital conversion, boolean logic, and various digital gate and multiplexing circuits.  If time permits, computer simulated analog and/or digital circuits may be studied. PHY 311 is required for all physics and pre-engineering majors, and some science teaching licensure.  PHY 311 is offered on an alternate year basis.

PHY

312

ADVANCED LABORATORY

Three credit hours

Prerequisite: PHY 131, 132 or PHY 145L, 146L, or instructor's permission

A laboratory course in which independent experiments of advanced level in physics and engineering are designed, performed and analyzed by the student, acting in consultation with the instructor. Results are expected to be obtained with sufficient care and detail to make the results comparable to quality research results. Typically, an independently designed project with an oral and/or a poster presentation is expected. PHY 312 may be repeated if different experiments are carried out each time it is taken. The current advanced lab topics offered are:

Advanced Labs

Optics and Holography: Review of lenses, mirrors, interference, diffraction, and their applications: Michelson and Mach-Zehder interferometers, Reflection and transmission holography.

Modern Physics: A lab designed primarily around the important physics experiments of the last century: e/m ratio of the electron, photo-electric effect, Franck-Hertz effect, gamma ray spectroscopy, Zeeman effect, scanning tunneling microscope, hydrogen/deuterium spectrum, semiconductors.

Computational Physics: A lab helping students write their own programs to solve problems in physics by numerical methods.

Special Lab Topics: With prior permission of the instructor, experiments, projects, or research of particular interest to the student may be arranged.

PHY

331

PHYSICAL MECHANICS I

Three credit hours

Prerequisite: PHY 131, 132 or PHY 145L, 146L, one year of calculus, or instructor's permission

A one-semester course in classical mechanics as developed by Galileo, Kepler, Newton and their successors. The course includes a brief review of first year topics, but progresses quickly beyond the introductory level to include such topics as damped and driven oscillatory motion, velocity-dependent forces, non-cartesian coordinate systems, rigid body motion and two-body and central force motion, and, as time permits, Lagrangian mechanics. PHY 331 is offered on an alternate year basis.

PHY

341

THEORETICAL PHYSICS

Three credit hours

A one-semester lecture course which explores the principles and mathematical methods underlying a wide range of topics in physics. The course will focus on solving problems efficiently with the appropriate coordinates systems and mathematical techniques. Problems will be taken from various fields of physics, such as solid state physics, nuclear physics, thermodynamics, electrodynamics, statistical mechanics, and quantum mechanics. Mathematical techniques will include those which impact most directly on physics, typically including vector analysis, calculus of functions of several variables, functions of complex variables, Fourier series, and partial differential equations such as the wave and heat equations.

PHY

361

ELECTROMAGNETISM

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: PHY 131, 132 or PHY 145L, 146L, one year of calculus, or instructor's permission

A study of electrostatics and magnetostatics. Includes topics dealing with the electric field and potential, dielectric materials, multipole expansions, the magnetic field, Laplaces equation, and Maxwells equations as time permits.

PHY

362

PHYSICS OF WAVES

Three credit hours

Prerequisite: PHY 131, 132 or PHY 145L, 146L, one year of calculus, or instructor's permission

A study of the nature of waves. May include topics from the areas of geometric optics, interference and diffraction phenomena, the production and propagation of electromagnetic and acoustic waves as well as the interaction of light and sound with matter. Spread sheet are used to solve appropriate problems.

PHY

371

THERMAL PHYSICS

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: PHY 131, 132 or PHY 145L, 146L, one year of calculus, or instructor's permission

A one-semester lecture course investigating the basic principles and ideas of thermodynamics and statistical mechanic including entropy, enthalpy, temperature, and the thermodynamic potentials. The course explores how traditional thermodynamics is best understood by looking at its underlying statistical roots as found in the Boltzmann and Gibbs distributions. If needed, the course may include a brief review of introductory topics.  The course is then expected to quickly move on to the investigation of   such advanced topics as the Maxwell relations, Bose and Fermi statistics, Debye and Einstein solids, and the Clausius-Clapeyron relation. Spreadsheets are used to solve appropriate problems.

PHY

372

QUANTUM PHYSICS

Three credit hours

Prerequisite: PHY 131, 132 or PHY 145L, 146L, one year of calculus, or instructor's permission

An introduction to the basic concepts and applications of quantum mechanics. Includes solutions to the Schrodinger wave equation in 1 and 3 dimensions. Potential wells, scattering, the hydrogen atom and elements of perturbation theory are among the topics normally covered.

PHY

410

SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICS

One to four credit hours

Offered only if there is sufficient demand. Consent of the instructor required for registration.

An in-depth study of selected areas of physics not normally covered in the courses offered by the department and which may be associated with the department's general education courses.

PHY

491,492

DEPARTMENTAL THESIS/PROJECT

Credit hours to be arranged

See Departmental Thesis/Project, Section II.

 

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