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  • BW Baldwin Wallace College

Faculty Spotlights

Colleen F. Visconti

student photo
  1. Department

    Communication Arts and Sciences

  2. Hometown

    Bay Village, OH

  3. Biography

    Colleen F. Visconti, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is Chair of the Department of Communication Arts and Sciences, Professor of Communication Disorders and Director of the Baldwin Wallace Speech Clinic at Baldwin Wallace University.

    She has a B.A. in Communication Sciences from Case Western Reserve University, a M.S. in Speech-Language Pathology from The Pennsylvania State University; and a Ph.D. in Child Language Disorders from Case Western Reserve University.

    She started teaching at BW as an adjunct instructor in the fall 1994, and became a full-time faculty member in the fall of 1999. Her research focuses on student engagement, problem-based learning, the use of technology in the classroom, clinical training for undergraduate students, and evidence-based practice for functionally nonverbal children. She has presented at state, regional and national conventions/conferences and her work has appeared in Hearsay and Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education.

    In November 2011, her book the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Speech-Language Pathology & Audiology: Evidence-Based Education will be published. It is co-authored by Dr. Visconti, Dr. Sarah Ginsberg (Eastern Michigan University) and Dr. Jen Friberg (Illinois State University).

    Dr. Visconti is currently the Past President of the Ohio Speech-Language-Hearing Association, and has served in several other capacities within this organization including President, Vice President, Director of Marketing and Public Relations, and Director of University and Student Affairs. At the national level Dr. Visconti has served the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) as a committee member for the 2011 ASHA Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Convention Committee; committee member for the 2010 ASHA Academic and Educational Issues Convention Committee; Associate Coordinator of ASHA's Division 10: Issues in Higher Education for two years (2008 and 2009); Legislative Councilor to ASHA representing the state of Ohio; and Associate Coordinator of the Speech-Language Pathology Speech-Language Science Assembly.

Questions and answers

Why did you choose to teach at BW?

I started teaching at BW initially because I was invited to teach a class on speech and language develop, which is a course that I truly love to teach. I have stayed at BW because it is a fabulous place to be. The best part of my job is interacting with the students. I love the small class size, the personal attention that I can give to my students, and how I really get to know my students as more than just a student in a seat. The other reason I love being at BW is how it is a family. Everyone here is so helpful, caring and willing to help in any way that they can. I can not imaging working anywhere else.

What characteristics distinguish BW from other colleges/universities?

I started teaching at BW initially because I was invited to teach a class on speech and language develop, which is a course that I truly love to teach. I have stayed at BW because it is a fabulous place to be. The best part of my job is interacting with the students. I love the small class size, the personal attention that I can give to my students, and how I really get to know my students as more than just a student in a seat. The other reason I love being at BW is how it is a family. Everyone here is so helpful, caring and willing to help in any way that they can. I can not imaging working anywhere else.

How do you mentor students?

Mentoring to me is an ongoing process that starts the first time that I meet a student. It involves getting to know the student and their interests and needs; and then guiding them through the choices to meet their goals. For me mentoring takes place in the classroom, clinical setting, research setting, advising appointments, and travel to state and national conventions. It is setting an example for my students and providing them with opportunities that will help them develop into caring and compassionate adults.

What do students like best about your class?

Students like the clear links that are made between the new concepts that they are learning and the stories or examples that are presented within the class. In the first several courses, I provide the examples and stories from my clinical experiences; however, once they begin working in the Speech Clinic the students are frequently the ones bringing the stories and examples into the classroom. Students frequently describe my classes as challenging, and say that they have to work hard to complete the problem-based assignments. I agree that I challenge my students to work hard and to push the limits of their knowledge and skills; however, by the end of the semester the students are amazed at what they have learned. By senior year, when the students are completing their Capstone reflections, they consistently write about being challenged, but feeling so well prepared for life after BW. They are thankful for being pushed academically to succeed beyond their expectations.

If you weren't teaching what would you be doing?

If I was not teaching, I would be working as a pediatric speech-language pathologist.