Conservatory of Music

EXCELLENCE...
From Bach to Broadway
 

Joseph Satava

Distinguished Visiting Guest

D.M., Peabody Conservatory
M.A., Julliard School
B.M., Peabody Conservatory

Prize-winning pianist Joseph Satava was the 2008 Second Prize recipient of the Bradshaw and Buono International Piano Competition and was named a Promising Young Artist by the National Society of Arts and Letters. He was recently awarded a 2011 Maryland State Arts Council individual artist award in classical music solo performance and was also a 2011 finalist in The American Prize. Satava has collaborated with orchestras, conductors, and music festivals throughout the US, Canada, France, and Spain. Mr. Satava has appeared in Alice Tully Hall as part of the Focus! Festival for contemporary music and in Merkin Concert Hall in New York City. Most recently, he performed with the Susquehanna Symphony Orchestra and at the College Music Society’s Composer’s Concert held at the University of Idaho.  Satava has been heard at the Music at Noon Concert Series at the Academy Art Museum in Easton, Maryland; Museo Evaristo Valle in Gijón, Spain; The Kosciuszko Foundation in New York City and First Church Concert Series in Boston, MA. Other appearances include the South Bend Symphony Orchestra, the Aspen Summer Music Festival, the Kneisel Hall Chamber Music Festival, the Music Academy of the West Summer Music Festival, the American Conservatory of Fontainbleau, France, and with the Orquesta Sinfonica de Gijón. Mr. Satava was on the faculty of the Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore, MD for ten years and currently holds a faculty position at Harford Community College in Bel Air, MD. He is the accompanist for the Bach in Baltimore concert series as well as a collaborative pianist at Shepherd University. A native of Cleveland, Ohio, he is a doctoral graduate of the Peabody Conservatory of the Johns Hopkins University, and holds a Master’s degree from the Julliard School as well as a Bachelor’s from Peabody. His primary teachers have included Julian Martin, Marc Durand, Jerome Lowenthal, Ann Schein, and Olga Radosavljevich.
Share |